Scottish Longitudinal Study
Development & Support Unit

Current Projects

Project Title:

Health inequalities among adolescents and young people in Scotland: an analysis linking the UK Censuses and the Scottish Longitudinal Study to health data.

Project Number:

2020_006

Researchers:

Ms Katrin Metsis, University of St Andrews
Prof Frank Sullivan, University of St Andrews
Dr Joanna Inchley, University of Glasgow
Dr Andrew Williams, University of St Andrews

Start Date:

1st January 2021

Summary:

This PhD project examines health inequalities among young people (aged 10-24 years) in Scotland by socio-economic (SE) groups. The project utilises data from the 2001 and 2011 UK Censuses, Scottish Longitudinal Study (SLS), and health data linked to the SLS. The main indicator of the SE position is the National Statistics Socio-economic classification (NS-SEC). I will use self-reported health (SRH) to measure health inequalities. The study cohort is young people who were 10-24-year-olds at the 2001 Census. The project seeks to answer the following research questions.

1) How does the SRH of Scottish young people compare to their peers in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NI)?

  • What are the differences across SE indicators?
  • How have the patterns changed between 2001 and 2011?

This research question is addressed by using data from the 2001 and 2011 UK Censuses.

2) Is SRH a stable measure: whether and how does it change as young people transfer into adulthood?

  • How has SRH changed among the study cohort (aged 10-24 in 2001) between 2001 and 2011?
  • Has the change been different across SE groups?
  • What are the methodological implications of the differences between the general health questions in 2001 and 2011?

This research question is addressed by using data from the SLS.

3) Does SRH in ages 10-24 predict health outcomes in adulthood?

  • Does SRH in ages 10-24 predict receipt of prescribed medication in adulthood?

For this part of the analysis, the SLS will be linked with the Prescribing Information System (PIS).

References:

Bauldry S, Shanahan MJ, Boardman JD, Miech RA, M. R. (2012) ‘A Life Course Model of Self-Rated Health through Adolescence and Young Adulthood’, Social Science & Medicine, 75(7), pp. 1311–1320. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.05.017.A.

Breidablik, H.-J., Meland, E. and Lydersen, S. (2008) ‘Self-rated health during adolescence: stability and predictors of change (Young-HUNT study, Norway)’, The European Journal of Public Health, 19(1), pp. 73–78. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckn111.

Bundy DAP, de Silva N, Horton S, Patton GC, Schultz L, J. D. for the D. C. P. 3 C. and A. H. and D. A. G. (2018) ‘Investment in child and adolescent health and development: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, The Lancet, 391(10121), pp. 687–699. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32417-0.

Elgar FJ, Pförtner T, Moor I, De Clercq B, Stevens GWJM, C. C. (2015) ‘Socio-economic inequalities in adolescent health 2002–2010: a time-series analysis of 34 countries participating in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study’, The Lancet, 385(9982), pp. 2088–2095. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61460-4.

Haugland S, Wold B, Stevenson J, Aaroe LE, W. B. (2001) ‘Subjective health complaints in adolescence: a cross-national comparison of prevalence and dimensionality’, The European Journal of Public Health, 11(1), pp. 4–10. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/11.1.4.

Hetlevik Ø, Vie TL, Meland E, Breidablik HJ, J. D. (2019) ‘Adolescent self-rated health predicts general practice attendance in adulthood: Results from the Young-HUNT1 survey’, Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 47(1), pp. 37–44. doi: 10.1177/1403494818772212.

Hetlevik, Ø. et al. (2019) ‘Adolescent self-rated health predicts general practice attendance in adulthood: Results from the Young-HUNT1 survey’, Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 47(1), pp. 37–44. doi: 10.1177/1403494818772212.

Idler, E. L. and Benyamini, Y. (1997) ‘Self-Rated Health and Mortality: A Review of Twenty-Seven Community Studies’, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 38(1), p. 21. doi: 10.2307/2955359.

Jylhä, M. (2009) ‘What is self-rated health and why does it predict mortality? Towards a unified conceptual model’, Social Science and Medicine, 69(3), pp. 307–316. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.05.013.

Lynch, J. and Smith, G. D. (2005) ‘A life course approach to chronic disease epidemiology’, Annual Review of Public Health, 26, pp. 1–35. doi: 10.1146/annurev.publhealth.26.021304.144505.

Lynch J, S. G. (2005) ‘A LIFE COURSE APPROACH TO CHRONIC DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY’, Annual Review of Public Health, 26(1), pp. 1–35. doi: 10.1146/annurev.publhealth.26.021304.144505.

Spencer, N. J., Blackburn, C. M. and Read, J. M. (2010) ‘Prevalence and social patterning of limiting long-term illness/disability in children and young people under the age of 20 years in 2001: UK census-based cross-sectional study’, Child: Care, Health and Development, 36(4), pp. 566–573. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2214.2009.01053.x.

Vie, T. L. et al. (2014) ‘Is self-rated health a stable and predictive factor for allostatic load in early adulthood? Findings from the Nord Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT)’, Social Science & Medicine, 117, pp. 1–9. doi: 10.1016/J.SOCSCIMED.2014.07.019.

Vie TL, Hufthammer KO, Holmen TL, Meland E, B. H. (2018) ‘Is self-rated health in adolescence a predictor of prescribed medication in adulthood? Findings from the Nord Trøndelag Health Study and the Norwegian Prescription Database’, SSM - Population Health, 4, pp. 144–152. doi: 10.1016/J.SSMPH.2017.11.010.

Viner, R. M. et al. (2012) ‘Adolescence and the social determinants of health’, The Lancet, 379(9826), pp. 1641–1652. doi: 10.1016/s0140-6736(12)60149-4.

WHO (2001) The Second Decade: Improving Adolescence Health and Development. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2007.07.028.

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